Home » Cancer Management in Man: Detection, Diagnosis, Surgery, Radiology, Chronobiology, Endocrine Therapy by Alfred L. Goldson
Cancer Management in Man: Detection, Diagnosis, Surgery, Radiology, Chronobiology, Endocrine Therapy Alfred L. Goldson

Cancer Management in Man: Detection, Diagnosis, Surgery, Radiology, Chronobiology, Endocrine Therapy

Alfred L. Goldson

Published September 30th 1989
ISBN : 9780898389982
Hardcover
296 pages
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 About the Book 

Previous volumes in this series have discussed the current progression have identified a variety of targets and strategies state of our knowledge concerning the pathophysiology of to allow these goals to be realized. This volume critically cancerMorePrevious volumes in this series have discussed the current progression have identified a variety of targets and strategies state of our knowledge concerning the pathophysiology of to allow these goals to be realized. This volume critically cancer growth and progression. The complexity of the in reviews approaches towards cancer management in man at teraction of malignant neoplasms and the host, the the levels of: detection, diagnosis, surgery, radiology, heterogeneity of malignant cell subpopulations, and the chronobiology and endocrine treatment. existence of metastatic tumor cells resistant to drug thera Several chapters review selected methods of cancer diag pies remain as significant clinical challenges to clinical on nosis. In addition, a variety of on-going and novel ap cologists. Indeed, conventional treatment regimens of che proaches for cancer treatment are also presented in this volume. Progress in the early detection of malignant neo motherapy, surgery and radiology are often ineffective for the therapy of a large variety of established metastatic can plasms, coupled with novel approaches for the therapy of cer in patients. When one considers the insidiousness of such neoplasms, may ultimately yield safe and well-tolerated agents for the selective therapy of solid malignancies. New progressive neoplastic growth and the emergence of con tinuously more aggressive and malignant cellular subpop therapeutic approaches, directed towards the biochemical ulations one is overwhelmed with the challenges inherent in and molecular targets identified in the earlier volumes of this series, may ultimately lead to the generation of new mo attempting to control malignant neoplasms.