Home » Benjamin Rush and His Services to American Education by Harry Gehman Good
Benjamin Rush and His Services to American Education Harry Gehman Good

Benjamin Rush and His Services to American Education

Harry Gehman Good

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230862002
Paperback
64 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 edition. Excerpt: ...of Vol. 41 of the RushMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1918 edition. Excerpt: ...of Vol. 41 of the Rush Manuscripts. In the fall, Dr. Nisbet resigned. The formal resignation is dated October 18, 1785, but the arrangements for his leaving had been begun about a month before.84 As early as September 4th, he wrote to Rush, that he is determined to return to Scotland because his health is wrecked and he will not be able to be of any service or even to exist in America. About this time he tried to get back his former situation as pastor at Montrose. He indignantly declares that he had not expected to be insulted by the Trustees by being told that they would not pay his passage home. Sir, he wrote, I have the magnanimity, weak as I am, not to ask it if I could do without it. But Necessity obliges me and you owe it to your own character and to the character of America, even not to harry us away as felons, or even as unserviceable dogs, when we have lost all our means of subsistence in your service. And he declares that it is highly improper for the most learn ed man in America to display his learning to the affront of a poor old clergyman.85 3 Rush MSS., V0l. 42, p. 9. Rush MSS., Vol. 41, p. 157 and preceding pages. 5 Rush MSS., Vol. 41, p. 145. Nisbet to Rush, Sept. 4, The Board accepted Dr. Nisbets resignation, and agreed to pay his traveling expenses to Scotland. A committee was appointed to pay his way to Philadelphia, and another, composed of Trustees living in Philadelphia, to pay his passage across the Atlantic. From the same letter we learn that Dr. Davidson was appointed Principal pro tempore.88 For some unexplained reason the ship on which Dr. Nisbet had intended to sail did not arrive when due, and, with the advent of cooler weather, his health...